Family Owned & Operated by The Cottages Senior Living

Is your family member living with a memory disorder struggling to sleep at night?

While each of us have experienced sleepless nights, we have the capabilities to overcome these struggles. Loved ones living with a memory disorder often have anxiety around this subject as they often forget what makes them comfortable.Here are a few tips to create a peaceful environment for your loved one and how you can help them overcome that anxious feeling. Look at the lighting in the room Are the lights too bright? Is there too little lighting? There should be a balance of light so that your loved one can safely get up in the night as needed, without making it so bright that sleep is hard to come by. If your loved one often wakes in the middle of the night, have a small dresser lamp available. By keeping the rest of the room dark, the brain understands that it is still nighttime and programs the body for sleeping. If the room has windows, try using blackout curtains, which are made to keep the light out and allow for privacy. Give them a “hug” Naturally, as humans, we respond to touch, especially when we feel nervous or anxious. Loved ones living with a memory disorder have this feeling almost nightly. Try using a weighted blanket. These blankets use pressure therapy to induce a calming effect. By having the same amount of weighted pressure placed on each part of the body, the brain can calm down and prepare for sleep. Also, make sure your loved one’s pillows are comfortable and not causing soreness, which may keep them up at night. Encourage a snack or warm drink Family members who...

Developing a plan to begin your loved one’s transition into memory care

Now that you’ve made the difficult decision to move your loved one to a memory care facility, it’s time to begin the preparation. Being prepared ahead of moving day will not only keep your household organized but will help keep your family member living with a memory disorder calm and unstressed. While there are multiple business items to take care of as you begin the transition into a care home, it is important to keep your loved one informed. Though they will likely be nervous about leaving their solace, keeping your loved one excited about the new services they will be receiving may help them feel more comfortable. Discussing what your loved one’s day-to-day living will look like is a great way to start. Show them an hourly list of activities available. Allow your loved one to look over this schedule multiple times to get familiar with it. While their schedule at home may be completely different, the visual allows them to see how things will change once they move into the facility. If it is necessary to make any changes to the schedule, make sure to discuss this with management before moving your family member in. Allow your loved one to take comfort items with them. This could be a special chair, a photo album or extra pillows. Perhaps offer a shopping trip to buy new items. Ensuring your loved one is surrounded by the things they enjoy often helps with anxiety during the transition. Most importantly, sit down as a family and discuss any questions your loved one may have. Reassure them that you will be close...

Looking for an assisted living facility that specializes in memory care and feeling overwhelmed with the choices?

Understanding the services offered will help make your decision easier. There are many factors to consider when families are trying to understand what services will be provided for their loved ones when they move into a memory care facility. Will they be safe? Will they be fed enough? What about medications? In many cases, families have been the primary providers for their family members living with a memory disorder. Providing daily care is often emotionally, physically and mentally draining on everyone involved. If your family has chosen to seek a higher level of care for your loved one, you must first understand what services will be provided. Knowing the care that will be provided will give everyone peace of mind.  What are the differences between a “skilled nursing” versus an “assisted living” environment? A skilled nursing facility has patients, while an assisted living facility has residents. At a skilled nursing facility, the patients are being treated by on site doctors and have more complex illnesses and medical needs. At an assisted living facility, residents have a range of needs, from help with daily living tasks such as bathing, dressing and mobility assistance to incontinence, and help managing medications or feeding. Mealtime can vary at both types of locations, depending on the needs of the resident or patient. At The Cottages, a family-owned and operated assisted living in Texas, all meals are served family style in a homelike setting. A skilled nursing facility will feel more clinical, as the rooms are furnished by the facility to be accessible for any medical emergency and are equipped with medical equipment. At an...

Making a Successful Transition to Assisted Living

The transition from independent life at home, or in the home of a loved one, to a memory care facility can be a difficult one for everyone involved. The uncertainty of adjustment and familiarity for your loved one can be incredibly hard, making it a decision that can never be taken lightly. If you are unsure how the transition to assisted living may be for your loved one, rest assured that The Cottages offer an assisted living facility that is unrivaled in Texas. The Cottages provide a different approach to Alzheimer’s assisted living by providing a welcoming, home-like environment and care from highly-qualified, loving staff.  Benefits of Assisted Living  The Cottages assisted living facilities are expertly designed, from an interior and exterior perspective, to provide everyone with an environment that replicates home living. Secure outdoor spaces and walking paths matched with the spacious interior simulates a quaint atmosphere. With seemingly endless space, the adjustment period for most residents at The Cottages is relatively short. Additionally, the daily routines for your loved one living at The Cottages provide them with the physical and mental activity needed to enjoy themselves. The Cottages provide scheduled activities, balanced meals and encourage relaxation periods. Also, family members are welcome to join at any time to make this transition even more fluid and meaningful. Quality Care  With a high staff-to-resident ratio, the team is built to provide individual attention and care for your loved ones. They specialize in getting to know everyone from a personal standpoint to ensure they enjoy their time based on what the individual needs and desires of each resident. With no...

Providing In-Home Care for Your Loved One Living with Dementia

Everyone would love to live as independently as possible for as long as they can. Unfortunately, that isn’t always a reality for loved ones living with Alzheimer’s and other memory disorders. Dangers loom large that were once minimal threats. Understanding the hazards that your loved one living with dementia encounters at home is the first step towards providing a safe environment. Dangers in the Home for Those Living with Dementia  Many common dangers for people living with dementia range from the seemingly trivial to extremely severe. What used to be a standard household function now may present a risk for your family member. For example, a kitchen is traditionally a room for everyone of all ages to share in a household. However, when living with someone with a memory disorder, the kitchen is full of hazards in the form of knives, ovens and hot stove tops. Even running the water in a sink or shower can be dangerous for your loved one when done without supervision. Other risks within a home include access to medications, firearms and sharp objects. Some of these may seem obvious, but if you’ve gotten used to keeping medicine in the bathroom cabinet, it can be an adjustment that could often go overlooked. Other dangers and hazards may be present anywhere in the house, such as a loved one slipping and falling or forgetting where they are. Keeping your loved one living with dementia safe should be taken very seriously and is a critical part of their well-being. It can be frustrating and difficult to continually identify new dangers and learn how to prevent it...